In the News

  • Grow Wire

    In short: Mobile voting is almost certainly the future of government elections: In this week’s general election, absentee voters from 25 states cast ballots online. Votem is one of a handful of mobile voting companies that allow voters to register and vote from laptops or phones. The company also has a blockchain voting product. Blockchain voting has the potential to create more security, convenience and collaboration between opposing political groups.

  • WKYC

    A new NBC poll found about only a third of millennials say they will vote on Tuesday, suggesting their turnout may not be strong. Yet a local company may have a solution that could help in future elections, and it lies in a voting app. Pete Martin is CEO for Votem, a Cleveland-based mobile voting company that could let you one day cast your ballot from anywhere. “The census bureau in the 2014 and 2016 election, they’ve done these extensive surveys on why people didn’t vote. No surprise, the number one reason was ‘I couldn’t make it to the polling place,’” he said.

  • Chamber of Digital Commerce

    Pete Martin, Votem Founder and CEO, sees the public’s leeriness of electronic voting and recent voting scandals as “both an opportunity and an issue.” “It just requires more education on our part. People are fearful, and I get it. But we're not going to shirk our responsibilities to make sure we can engender the trust with elections officials and people buying the system," said Martin. The implications for developing countries which do not yet have the voting infrastructure that the United States has are even more dramatic and could prove a powerful instrument for the continuing spread of representative democracy. Voting should be as easy as hopping online from home to pay bills from your checking account. In today’s digital age, we can do better.

  • The New York Times

    Our democracy depends on addressing these vulnerabilities. The more that eligible voters participate in elections and the more transparent and durable the process, the more legitimate the outcome. Fortunately, a simple solution to the problem exists, if we allow citizens to vote online using their smartphone or home computer. There is no shortage of politicians in power who benefit from the inaccessibility, insecurity, or lack of public faith in the electoral process. They have every reason to cast doubt upon, or outright oppose, an improvement in the way elections are run. But with the benefits of blockchain-based online voting so clear, citizens should insist that voters’ interests come first.

  • BlockTeq

    In this episode of Blockteq Talk, Jeff Stern of Votem explains the work that Votem does and how they help make elections more accessible, trustworthy and secure by using a blockchain. Jeff also details the problems that exist within the existing voting system, why Votem is well suited to solve these problems, the difficulties Votem faces, how Votem stands out from other mobile voting platforms, Votem’s open source “Proof of Vote” blockchain system, and much more.

  • Digital Politics

    Pete Martin, Founder and CEO, Votem Corp. is focused on making it easier for people to register and vote particularly on their mobile devices taking advantage of a secure mobile blockchain voting platform. With the acquisition of Everyone Counts, Votem is expanding the universe of those who are being offered the opportunity to vote online. With a just announced online voter guide and online ballot being developed for Los Angeles County voters, the move to bringing the election process into the 21st Century is starting to gain momentum.

  • Independent Sector

    This year, Independent Sector and Accenture partnered to launch a new initiative to uncover some of the most novel examples of organizations leveraging new I.T. to drive social change. The Innovate for Good Challenge recognizes organizations catalyzing social change through their use of new I.T. such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, and/or extended reality. We were overwhelmed by exceptional application entries and nominations from extraordinary organizations advancing social impact in this inaugural year of the challenge

  • Cleveland Magazine

    “We’re building a company for the future, not the past,” says Martin. “We were convinced blockchain is clearly the future.” Votem has run internal elections for unions, the Ohio State Bar Association and public elections for military service members overseas. After bots polluted the 2015 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame fan vote with bogus submissions, Votem took over administering it. The process is relatively simple. After verifying their identity, voters cast their ballots in an app or on an online webpage. Votem’s software, built using blockchain protocol, tracks and checks the ballot from submission to when it is counted. Since the blockchain network is transparent, voters can track their ballot from casting to counting too.

  • Onwrd Podcast

    Democracy could use a reboot. A systems upgrade. We are in the middle of the 21st Century, and many basic democratic structures are way out of date. Voting is one of the most obvious examples. In today’s episode, I talk to Jeffrey Stern of Votem, a mobile voting platform designed to securely cast votes in elections across the globe. Votem is one of many social innovators helping shift our democratic institutions into the digital age by improving the accessibility and security of the sacred right to vote. For more information, connect with twitter.com/@sternJefe

  • The Brookings Institution

    This highlights a need to create awareness among the government officials and build the technological capabilities for making possible a technology-driven, transparent electoral process. According to Pete Martin, CEO of Votem and a proponent of online voting, we are two years away from major online elections running on blockchain in the U.S. As governments change, the process of electing such governments is bound to change too—and blockchain may have a part to play.

  • Atelier BNP Paribas

    Votem is exploring the same territory, developing a system – also using blockchain technology – that enables citizens to vote in a secure manner on their smartphone. The Cleveland, Ohio-based company argues that this mechanism will help to discourage abstention by making it easier and more convenient to vote, reducing the risk of electoral fraud, and consequently restoring public trust in the democratic process. Having carried out a number of dry runs at private elections, Votem is planning to put this technology to the test at the forthcoming mid-term elections in the United States

  • Stanford Graduate School of Business

    That potential extends well beyond the world of digital currencies, which is where blockchain remains in the popular imagination — for now. “People still think ‘bitcoin’ when they hear the word cryptocurrency,” Galen says, “but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Beneath the surface is the much more robust blockchain platform that goes well beyond bitcoin and cryptocurrencies.” A blockchain is essentially a shared digital ledger that records transactions and stores data in a transparent, decentralized way, making it a powerful tool for a range of social enterprises, from tracking coffee through a supply chain to building a credit system for the 2 billion “unbanked” people worldwide who still lack basic financial services. The study looked at applications in every major sector and found that healthcare, financial inclusion, aid, and democracy and governance were the areas with the most existing “blockchain for good” initiatives... ...During the 2016 U.S. elections, the Montana state government worked with Votem, a Cleveland-based mobile voting platform, to use distributed ledger technology for absentee voters. A post-election survey determined that 99% percent of voters who used the Montana system found it convenient and would use it again. “The potential for positive social impact in the U.S. is great,” the Stanford researchers write, noting that more than 2.6 million U.S. citizens living overseas were eligible to vote back home in 2014, but only 93,000 of them did — a turnout of 4%.

  • CNN

    Votem argues mobile voting has the potential to boost voter turnout, increase accuracy and reignite trust in election results. The company says it can verify and count votes in real time on its blockchain voting platform.

  • Stanford Graduate School of Business | Center for Social Innovation

    The investment and innovation in Democracy and Governance applications of blockchain technology speaks to its great potential value to the public sector and citizens...Distributed ledger technology, the same technology underlying blockchain, makes votes instantly traceable and impossible to edit. The “audit trail” question is paramount for any voting system, and storing records across a distributed ledger helps to ensure the integrity of the vote as it is happening (and afterward), rather than relying on a centralized database which could be a target for attacks. Furthermore, voters can actually verify that their vote was cast and counted.

  • FastCompany

    Projects that aim to improve democracy and governance were the most advanced of all those studied, with 62% expected to deliver results in the next six months, according to the analysis. That includes companies like the mobile voting platform Votem, which has worked with Montana’s state government to allow military and other overseas voters to securely fill out electronic absentee ballots.

  • MarketWatch

    Cleveland-based Votem Corp. announced Monday it had launched a new Proof of Vote Protocol that hopes to improve the voting process by using blockchain technology. By utilizing the blockchain, the company said voting will become more transparent, more verifiable and increase trust.

  • Crain's Cleveland Business

    Votem is a Cleveland tech company developing a blockchain-based voting platform that Martin wants to become the new global standard for voting. "But they're probably ahead of the wave with what they're doing. I think it's very smart to be applying blockchain to things like voting, and I really hope they're successful."

  • Qrius

    Blockchain technology ensures anonymity of the voters as they are veiled from any probable suppression. It uses an encrypted key that guarantees heightened security and privacy in comparison to the traditional ballot boxes. A blockchain is also immutable; it provides for a hassle-free auditing without the risk of tampering. The most pivotal security advantage of the blockchain is decentralisation. As the ledger is distributed across a public network, there is nothing like a single storage base. This aspect makes it difficult and almost impossible to hack a blockchain system.

  • Stanford Social Innovation Review

    Five main challenges to eDemocracy remain. Here, we outline each challenge, as well as recent developments that suggest that integrating eDemocracy with impact investing and innovative public policy may be the best method for overcoming many if not all of them...Here are the leaders in eDemocracy validation:​Votem

  • Forbes

    In August, the U.S. Election Assistance Commission announced that Votem would be participating in its voting system testing and certification program. The company is partnered with the Blockchain Research Institute and the National Association of Secretaries of State, and hopes to have 1 billion people using its technologies by 2025.